A hangover from a weekend junk seems to be amplified tenfold when met with that nasty sunburn. “But I put on sunscreen when I left the house!” you cry out to the universe as someone rubs aloe vera on your burn. But, says the sun, you didn’t follow the anti-sun burn rules.

Lets revisit, and let BloomMe save you from a week of ouch.

 

I see SPF written on sunscreen all the time, what does it actually mean?

SPF stands for sun protection factor, and it refers to the length of time it takes for your skin to burn when exposed to UVA and UVB rays with the cream applied . For example, if you usually burn after 10 minutes in the sun, applying an SPF 15 sunscreen would allow you to stay in the sun without burning for approximately 150 minutes. This is a rough estimate and should not be taken as an exact time frame, remember SPF is actually a measure of protection from amount of UVB exposure and it is not meant to help you time your sunburn with accuracy.

Most people under apply sunscreen on their skin, sometimes because a high SPF product like 50+ can leave you with a ghost sheen which is not the nicest on a junk.

 

Let’s have a quick peek at the SPF scale:

SPF 15 blocks 93% of UVB rays
SPF 30 blocks 97% of UVB rays 
SPF 50 blocks 98% of UVB rays

 

So by this scale, an SPF 30 sunscreen only gives you 4% more protection than SPF 15 sunscreen. Rather than reaching for the highest SPF possible, instead try to go midrange and apply meticulously, and frequently. You’re better off with an SPF 30+ applied with care than a 50+ slopped haphazardly over (and let’s face it, it’s difficult to apply sunscreen after a certain amount of junk-drinking so make sure you do it correctly!).

 

Which sunscreen should I get?

There are two types of sunscreens: physical and chemical (although technically the physical ones are also chemical but shush).

Physical sunscreens contain minerals like zinc oxide or titanium dioxide, and they work to reflect and scatter UV radiation from reaching your skin. Physical sunscreens aren’t too resistant to water of sweat and can rub off easily.

Chemical sunscreens work by absorbing the UV rays. They do take about 20 minutes to sink in, and they are resistant to sweat and water.

 

How much sunscreen should I apply?

 

When it comes to sunscreen, you should aim for around teaspoon of sunscreen per limb, one each for the front and back of the torso, and one for the face, neck and ears. Can’t do the maths? That’s around 7 tablespoons for your whole body. We don’t recommend bringing a tablespoon with you on a junk to measure out the amount, so think of it as roughly the amount that fits in your hand.

When it comes to application, just go nuts with it. Rub it in every bit of your skin, and that includes the ears, back of the neck, back of your hands, and even the top of your feet. If you’re not too concerned about slipping over on the junk then also apply on the bottom of your feet. When you are sun-baking face down your soles are facing the sun, and we cannot tell you how painful a sunburn on the bottom of the feet can be.

Apply the sunscreen 20 minutes before jumping in the sun and every 2 hours after jumping in the ocean for maximum protection.

 

Sunscreen irritates my sensitive skin. Should I just not put it on?

Are you insane? Wear sunscreen!

When it comes to sunscreen, if you’re finding that your generic 7/11 brands are irritating to the skin, then you have to start hunting for some that are designed for sensitive skin rather than generic. Most will be labeled with “sensitive” or “gentle”, and even better if you can find one fragrance free.

 

Ready to depart of your maiden voyage? Ahoy, junk trip, it’s time to cast off!

 

Managed to avoid getting burnt but got a hangover that won’t quit? BloomMe to the rescue!

A hangover from a weekend junk seems to be amplified tenfold when met with that nasty sunburn. “But I put on sunscreen when I left the house!” you cry out to the universe as someone rubs aloe vera on your burn. But, says the sun, you didn’t follow the anti-sun burn rules. Lets revisit, and…